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Diamond Card Talk Member
Picture of Raven
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quote:
Originally posted by Electrawoman Cards f/k/a jane:
It’s funny, she must have mellowed as she aged. My wife and I went to see her in "My Fair Lady” when it was revived on Broadway in, I think 2018.
She graciously signed our Playbills after the play, and just in case, we brought an 8x10 of Oleanna Tyrell and Emma Peel, and she signed those for us too. She was very gracious and lovely to us. At any rate, I treasure those autographs.


I'm not surprised by that. From what I have read Diana Rigg always thought of herself as a stage actor, first and foremost. When she was younger and straight out of "The Avengers" she could have starred in many "girlfriend/damsels in distress" roles. That annoyed her and she didn't take very much advantage of those prime years, as other lesser actresses did. Her TV work only seemed to increase when she grew older. But she always stuck with her theatre work.

Stage actors always support the play and I have gotten many signed Playbills from people standing at the backdoor. As long as they don't get mobbed, the assumption is that the "fan" has paid to see the play and the actors will often stop to sign at least a few before going home. So I would think Rigg would also follow that tradition. It's not that she was nasty, she just didn't care that much about her most popular work and didn't want to live off of it.

On a sidenote, a signed Playbill is no guarantee of authenticity. They are fairly easy to obtain in new condition, even for plays long gone. When you see ones that are signed by the entire cast or all the big-name stars, that is very hard to get done at the backdoor. So you have to evaluate signed Playbills the same way you would research a signed poster. Anybody really hard to get is more likely to be faked. The "signed in-person at such and such theatre on such and such a date" is a well-worn description that is easy to say and hard to prove or disprove.
 
Posts: 10502 | Location: New York | Registered: November 20, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Gold Card Talk Member
Picture of Electrawoman Cards f/k/a jane
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Raven:
quote:
Originally posted by Electrawoman Cards f/k/a jane:
It’s funny, she must have mellowed as she aged. My wife and I went to see her in "My Fair Lady” when it was revived on Broadway in, I think 2018.
She graciously signed our Playbills after the play, and just in case, we brought an 8x10 of Oleanna Tyrell and Emma Peel, and she signed those for us too. She was very gracious and lovely to us. At any rate, I treasure those autographs.


I'm not surprised by that. From what I have read Diana Rigg always thought of herself as a stage actor, first and foremost. When she was younger and straight out of "The Avengers" she could have starred in many "girlfriend/damsels in distress" roles. That annoyed her and she didn't take very much advantage of those prime years, as other lesser actresses did. Her TV work only seemed to increase when she grew older. But she always stuck with her theatre work.

Stage actors always support the play and I have gotten many signed Playbills from people standing at the backdoor. As long as they don't get mobbed, the assumption is that the "fan" has paid to see the play and the actors will often stop to sign at least a few before going home. So I would think Rigg would also follow that tradition. It's not that she was nasty, she just didn't care that much about her most popular work and didn't want to live off of it.

On a sidenote, a signed Playbill is no guarantee of authenticity. They are fairly easy to obtain in new condition, even for plays long gone. When you see ones that are signed by the entire cast or all the big-name stars, that is very hard to get done at the backdoor. So you have to evaluate signed Playbills the same way you would research a signed poster. Anybody really hard to get is more likely to be faked. The "signed in-person at such and such theatre on such and such a date" is a well-worn description that is easy to say and hard to prove or disprove.


True, but Playbills don’t sell for much compared to autograph cards or 8x10 authentic signed photos. I haven’t checked, but you could probably find a really cheap Adam Driver from BURN THIS on eBay as compared to a Star Wars signature. Hard to trust, if not authenticated, but I’ve never once sold a signed Playbill. It’s a treasured memory of a great night for me. I have a main cast signed Playbill from NETWORK with Bryan Cranston, Tatiana Maslany & Tony Goldwyn. If you look on ebay, it doesn’t fetch much for the three main cast member, but I shudder to think how much money Cranston could make if he did a private Breaking Bad signing.

____________________
Anne Welles - "You've got to climb Mount Everest to reach the Valley of the Dolls."

 
Posts: 3218 | Location: Queens NYC | Registered: September 21, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Diamond Card Talk Member
Picture of Raven
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quote:
Originally posted by Electrawoman Cards

True, but Playbills don’t sell for much compared to autograph cards or 8x10 authentic signed photos. Hard to trust, if not authenticated, but I’ve never once sold a signed Playbill.


Oh yeah, that's why I like to stick to licensed certified cards. In addition to paying for the limited production of the card, the signature comes with the guarantee of authenticity from the card maker or signer depending on the wording, which is about as good as it gets shy of in-person.

You're right that most signed Playbills are fairly cheap and not in demand without separate third party authentication. Autograph hounds would rather have an 8x10 signed, although Broadway isn't that far away from me and I have seen signed Playbills, along with plenty of autographed books, lying around in secondhand thrift shops.

Now could the cheap signed Playbill make for a good pricy cut signature card? From what I've seen card makers use, very likely. Big Grin
 
Posts: 10502 | Location: New York | Registered: November 20, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Electrawoman Cards f/k/a jane
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Raven:
quote:
Originally posted by Electrawoman Cards

True, but Playbills don’t sell for much compared to autograph cards or 8x10 authentic signed photos. Hard to trust, if not authenticated, but I’ve never once sold a signed Playbill.


Oh yeah, that's why I like to stick to licensed certified cards. In addition to paying for the limited production of the card, the signature comes with the guarantee of authenticity from the card maker or signer depending on the wording, which is about as good as it gets shy of in-person.

You're right that most signed Playbills are fairly cheap and not in demand without separate third party authentication. Autograph hounds would rather have an 8x10 signed, although Broadway isn't that far away from me and I have seen signed Playbills, along with plenty of autographed books, lying around in secondhand thrift shops.

Now could the cheap signed Playbill make for a good pricy cut signature card? From what I've seen card makers use, very likely. Big Grin


Indeed they could. Especially with people like Driver or Tom Hiddleston, Daniel Craig, etc. who will only sign Playbills after a performance.

____________________
Anne Welles - "You've got to climb Mount Everest to reach the Valley of the Dolls."

 
Posts: 3218 | Location: Queens NYC | Registered: September 21, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Electrawoman Cards f/k/a jane:
I shudder to think how much money Cranston could make if he did a private Breaking Bad signing.


I wonder -- how much does a star make from doing a signing for cards inserted in packs?

I assume that it varies with the star.
Shatner probably gets more than a b-lister off The Walking Dead.

But what is a reasonable estimate? Perhaps $5 a card at the low end, and maybe $100 at the top?
 
Posts: 2244 | Location: Huntsville, AL United States | Registered: November 30, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Bill Mullins:
But what is a reasonable estimate? Perhaps $5 a card at the low end, and maybe $100 at the top?


I think the person willing to sign 500 cards just might still do it at $5 a pop. But the A-lister who will only do 50 at a time and sees the buying prices for their autograph cards on the open market will want more than $5,000 to participate.

They know, or their representatives know, that having the big-name celebrities signing in these products, even at high odds, is the thing that sells the cards out. It used to be the cards over a $100 that were the golden tickets, but now it's the cards over $1,000. Over $5,000. Yeah, even $10,000 with grading.

How much money would you ask for if you knew the card you signed 3 months ago is up on eBay for $6,000 today? I don't know either, but higher than $100 a pop, I think.
 
Posts: 10502 | Location: New York | Registered: November 20, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Silver Card Talk Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Mullins:
I wonder -- how much does a star make from doing a signing for cards inserted in packs?

I assume that it varies with the star.
Shatner probably gets more than a b-lister off The Walking Dead.

But what is a reasonable estimate? Perhaps $5 a card at the low end, and maybe $100 at the top?


I often wondered that myself. I just watched an interview with Brian Gray from Leaf and he was talking about when he first got the Kardashians to sign for Pop Century, before they became what they are now. He paid Kim $25 per signature and the other sisters $5. So there's your barometer. Big Grin I can't believe what Kim's cards are currently selling for, so I would assume she'd want a lot more per sig now. I remember hearing something about Harrison Ford too and what they were paying him when he first started signing for Star Wars/Indiana Jones. I can't recall the exact figure but I think it was something like $1000 per signature. Those were the days when he used to have around 8 autographs per product. His autographs seem a little bit more plentiful now. I have to think that people like Emma Watson, Downey, Jackman, etc. would be asking a lot more per signature nowadays compared to when they originally signed though. That's if they are at all aware of the current market value of their cards. I'd like to know what Rittenhouse paid Emilia Clarke when she signed for the first two GOT sets (which I assume were signed at the same time) compared to what they have to pay her now. Probably $5 per card then compared to hundreds now.
 
Posts: 2147 | Location: Pennsylvania | Registered: September 14, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Raven:

How much money would you ask for if you knew the card you signed 3 months ago is up on eBay for $6,000 today?


But are there any signed cards from the last 3 months that are already $6k?
 
Posts: 2244 | Location: Huntsville, AL United States | Registered: November 30, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Diamond Card Talk Member
Picture of Raven
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Mullins:
quote:
Originally posted by Raven:

How much money would you ask for if you knew the card you signed 3 months ago is up on eBay for $6,000 today?


But are there any signed cards from the last 3 months that are already $6k?


No idea about specific signing times. Wink The 3-month part was an exaggeration to make the point that these are very recently produced cards. It could be 3 months, or six months or a year. However long it takes the manufacturers to get these sets ready to go out the door.

I could bring up several celebrities as examples, but as we are in a GoT thread, just look at the sale prices on Clarke's autographed single and dual cards and Harrington's dual and signed relic in Complete 2. Frankly I don't even consider them A-Listers in the greater scheme of things, but for GoT they are the golden tickets.

If RA was lucky, perhaps they have held on to these cards for a long time and they came as a cheap package back when the actors didn't know their worth yet. All I know is, there have been private signings of any item you send in advertised for Clarke at around $300 minimum this past year.

That's not an in-person meet, just a mail-in and it won't produce a super limited licensed card either. When actors sign for these sets, they know that it's business and the card maker has to be getting more than they are being paid. But how much more is reasonable when it's your autograph that is the key component? And that's just on retail too, the secondary market is where the thousands come in.

These recent cards are selling like vintage collectibles on people who, if they are lucky, can sign their names for another 50 years. Are these prices sustainable? So far, they have been.
 
Posts: 10502 | Location: New York | Registered: November 20, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I could buy the idea that there are exceptions to $100 as a high end -- but not many. Harrison Ford, Robert Downey Jr., a few others.

If a random mail-in item costs $300 for a Clarke signature, I doubt she personally ends up with much more than $200 per. She's got the hassle of meeting the host at some location on a particular day. Each item has to be handled individually and specifically, which is much slower than signing a stack of a couple hundred cards.

If you look at it, not on a per-signature, but on the value of her time, I'm sure she makes much more money per hour signing a stack of cards at $100 per than she would signing the random assortment of items that would come in on a consignment signing at a retail of $300 per. And she can do it at home at her kitchen table, in her bathrobe. A sheet of stickers is even quicker.

Yes, some of them may show up on ebay for $6k (or more). But signing 200 cards at $100 each is still $20k for an hour or so's work.
 
Posts: 2244 | Location: Huntsville, AL United States | Registered: November 30, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Electrawoman Cards f/k/a jane
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A little birdie has told me it varies per company, but it can be anywhere from $10/card for 500 cards to $25k++++ for the big stars to sign 100 cards(or unfortunately, stickers).

____________________
Anne Welles - "You've got to climb Mount Everest to reach the Valley of the Dolls."

 
Posts: 3218 | Location: Queens NYC | Registered: September 21, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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