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HOW BAD DO YOU WANT AN AUTOGRAPH OR PICTURE?
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Platinum Card Talk Member
Picture of Raven
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quote:
Originally posted by chesspieceface:
I wish I'd gotten a better picture of this, but it was a wall of seemingly unclaimed pictures from the Photo Op company at Comic-con. I don't know if you paid in advance or not, but if not, these people who got to meet the celebrities, however briefly, and then didn't pick up the pictures, got to meet them for free, I suppose.


I miss the 90's too. For one thing I was a heck of a lot younger Big Grin

As for those photos CPK, I really doubt anybody got anything for free. Typically you must pay for the photo at the time, then come back at a later day to pick it up. That's at a regular store signing, a Con may do things a little differently, but they will have a way of getting the money upfront.

Those may be duplicate photos put up to advertise the company and the appearances. I have seen people not come back for their pictures occasionally. Binders are kept of unclaimed pictures. I don't understand wasting the money, but it happens. However the photos are still paid for, even if left behind.
 
Posts: 7065 | Location: New York | Registered: November 20, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Obi Wan Chrisobi
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Every convention that I've ever been to that has done photo ops has had the rule in place that you pay in advance and pick up your photo later (sometimes a few moments later or sometimes hours later depending on the service being used). As to why people wouldn't pick theirs up, sometimes people have to head out before their pics are ready. My local convention has gone to great lengths over the past few years to make sure that you get your photo within minutes of it being taken so that your shot doesn't get left behind.

____________________
"These aren't the cards you're looking for...."
 
Posts: 425 | Location: Canada | Registered: August 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Gold Card Talk Member
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quote:
Originally posted by chesspieceface:
I wish I'd gotten a better picture of this, but it was a wall of seemingly unclaimed pictures from the Photo Op company at Comic-con. I don't know if you paid in advance or not, but if not, these people who got to meet the celebrities, however briefly, and then didn't pick up the pictures, got to meet them for free, I suppose.


A few years ago at Wizard World Chicago they were ridiculously behind in printing out the photos. . . I know some people couldn't get their photos because they had tickets to con sponsored events they paid for and their photos weren't ready before they had to leave. . . Not sure if the con got them there photos or a refund. . . hopefully the promoter did something for them -- and these people. . .
 
Posts: 4246 | Location: Parts Unknown. | Registered: January 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Bronze Card Talk Member
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Sadly the days of most free signatures are over and done. Agents also have a lot to do with it. They all want a cut. Things really depend on the celebrity, the promoter and how they are brought in. Some celebrities come on their own dime, they pay for their flight and hotel room. Some of the bigger names are brought in by companies or the promoters that either pay the celebrity a flat fee or give the celebrity a percentage of the signatures that they sign. That's why you see some performers actually ticking off the number of autographs they do. In the early days you always were able to get a free autograph if you were willing to wait in line. Most artists will still sign for free although there are a few exceptions.

quote:
Originally posted by Scifi_Collector:
How I miss the early 90's.

I-Conn on Long Island cost $50 for the weekend and no additional charge for autographs. Star Trek DS9, Nana Visitor, Alexander Siddig, Andrew J. Robinson And Babbylon 5 guests.

NYC convention at the Pennsylvania Hotel. $30 entrance No additional charge Terry Farrel Autograph.

In early 2000 I went to a Grand Slam in California, I don't remember the entrance fee but I paid $50 to meet and get a Kate Mulgrew Autograph, She wouldn't look up to say hello.

Also early 2000, NJ convention. It wasn't alot to get in, More DS9, Babylon 5 signers and John de Lancie all free autographs.

Mid 2000, Every convention I went to wanted additional money for an autograph. Maybe $10 or $20. I purchased Grace Lee Whitney. When I was leaving the convention you had to pass the Hotel check-in/check-out line. In front of me checking out of the hotel was René Auberjonois. That's when I realized these "stars" are only regular people standing in line like everyone else. That was the last time I paid for an autograph at any convention.
 
Posts: 916 | Location: WESTWOOD NJ | Registered: May 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Silver Card Talk Member
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quote:
Originally posted by FRANK AMICO:
Most artists will still sign for free although there are a few exceptions.

That's an excellent point, Frank. Heck, many of them will even do quick sketches for free. But for every Stallone charging $350 there are 25 artists happy to sign something for you for free.
 
Posts: 1282 | Location: NJ | Registered: August 28, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Platinum Card Talk Member
Picture of Raven
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quote:
Originally posted by Ted Dastick Jr.:
quote:
Originally posted by FRANK AMICO:
Most artists will still sign for free although there are a few exceptions.

That's an excellent point, Frank. Heck, many of them will even do quick sketches for free. But for every Stallone charging $350 there are 25 artists happy to sign something for you for free.


Artists are a different breed, they love their work and want to share it. Sure some want really big money, but I have found the majority to be both talented and giving.

Quick story, I don't know how many collectors here got involved in the card game Magic the Gathering. I never played it, but I collected the early cards for the artwork. In the first few versions the artists owned the rights to their work. Their addresses were printed in gaming mags and you could write them and send in their Magic cards to autograph.

I had a terrific time mailing out Magic cards with little notes and nearly 90% answered back not just with the signed cards, but with handwritten thank you notes, and extra signed cards of their own, and a couple even sent back sketches.

When the company that made Magic changed its policy to screw those original artists that helped get it off the ground out of their reprint commissions in later versions, most of them refused to continue and I stopped collecting the cards in support. A useless gesture to be sure, but I had great respect for them and felt they had been taken advantage.

Most of those people were graphic artists and I don't ever recall seeing their names on the non-sport sketch lists, but I am talking about close to 20 years ago. Still artists are unique people not to be lumped in with the celebrity crowd.
 
Posts: 7065 | Location: New York | Registered: November 20, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hear, hear!

One of the reasons why I don't chase after checklists for a lot of gaming-related sets is that I'm a sucker for giving artist credits, whenever I can find them. (Actually, fantasy art is what got me started in the non-sports card hobby. Cool stuff without the financial strain of 90 prints. I guess I could now scan or search the web for all of my magazine collection covers!)

Some of the gaming sets never were widely sought by the gamers, but have some amazing art. The Guardians series went so far as subtitling some cards based on the artist, like "Brom's Angelic", "Maitz's Lightning", "Ploog's Chicken", and "Warhola's Snakes".

MTG might become a project because every card is scanned into the internet, sometimes with artist credit outside the scan.

I applaud the effort of some of the art-related-set manufacturers to give the artists some real promotional space. The base cards from Galan's Contemporary Pinups gives website links and can be used like fancy business cards, like those you might find at artist tables at shows.

I guess I'm also proud to say that I knew some of those "unique people" before they were also allowed to mingle in the celebrity crowd occasionally. You've got to market your work to put food on the table, but even if you *know* you've got great talent, success can still bring some giggles.

My favorite sketch cards are those that were ACEOs done by artists before they were asked to participate by one of the major manufacturers. Wink
 
Posts: 2287 | Location: North Augusta, SC, USA | Registered: November 28, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Gold Card Talk Member
Picture of jane
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quote:
Originally posted by Scifi_Collector:
I don't remember the entrance fee but I paid $50 to meet and get a Kate Mulgrew Autograph, She wouldn't look up to say hello.




Slighty off topic, but either I caught her on a good day or you caught her on a bad day. When I got her autograph she was nothing but pleasant.

____________________
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Posts: 3016 | Location: Queens NYC | Registered: September 21, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Contest Czar
Picture of barobehere
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quote:
Originally posted by jane:
quote:
Originally posted by Scifi_Collector:
I don't remember the entrance fee but I paid $50 to meet and get a Kate Mulgrew Autograph, She wouldn't look up to say hello.




Slighty off topic, but either I caught her on a good day or you caught her on a bad day. When I got her autograph she was nothing but pleasant.


I was at a con and met Christina Carpenter and she was super sweet with me. I was in line for someone else at the same con and the people behind me were saying she was cold and rude. Sometimes all it takes is one small event to change someones attitude for an entire day.
 
Posts: 5512 | Location: Meridian, Mississippi | Registered: November 23, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Contest Czar
Picture of barobehere
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Another good example is setting. I know I have told this before since it happened in 2001 and 2006.
I was at a booksigning by Bruce Campbell and there were slightly over 700 people there. My son was 1 1/2 at the time.Everyone had a numbered ticket. I think I had 56. Bruce talked for about an hour. The first 10 people got their books signed. Bruce stopped and stood up. Told the crowd there were about a dozen or so people with kids and would they mind letting us go first. Everyone was cool with it. He promised that since he visiting his family he had all night to do this and then spend the rest of the week with them. I got moved ahead of the line and spent a few minutes talking to him. It was awesome. Super time. Talked with a guy I had met there the next day and he had number in the hundreds and Bruce saw him for several minutes after I had already left. He stayed until everyone had seen him.

Fast forward. San Diego Comic Con. They had him going through 2500 people every two hours. He was signing so fast that he even made an error on mine which is funny. They were saying book, Book, no book (if you bought his book there he would personalize it). He never had a chance to look up and I was on my way with my signed copy that reads, "Hey Book
Barrett!"
 
Posts: 5512 | Location: Meridian, Mississippi | Registered: November 23, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Silver Card Talk Member
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quote:
Originally posted by barobehere:
Fast forward. San Diego Comic Con. They had him going through 2500 people every two hours. He was signing so fast that he even made an error on mine which is funny. They were saying book, Book, no book (if you bought his book there he would personalize it). He never had a chance to look up and I was on my way with my signed copy that reads, "Hey Book
Barrett!"


That's pretty cool. I met Jonathan Harris at a con ages ago. He started to sign my photo and his pen was drying up. Then he exclaimed in perfect Dr. Smith voice "Oh, this damn pen!" So my signed picture is far from perfect as you can see all the marks he was making with the bad pen, but it definitely gives the autograph character and makes the memory of meeting him still stand out above so many others. Smile
 
Posts: 1282 | Location: NJ | Registered: August 28, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post



Bronze Card Talk Member
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Man I hate false starts and bad signatures. Sooo many horror stories about people picking the darkest place on a picture to sign-WHO SIGNS BLACK ON BLACK? Signatures that were stopped and started again because someone asked a question. I even have a couple signatures where the celebrity spelled their name wrong! Here let me just go over my name again with this pen!--AS ZIPPY SAYS "YOW!"

quote:
Originally posted by Ted Dastick Jr.:
quote:
Originally posted by barobehere:
Fast forward. San Diego Comic Con. They had him going through 2500 people every two hours. He was signing so fast that he even made an error on mine which is funny. They were saying book, Book, no book (if you bought his book there he would personalize it). He never had a chance to look up and I was on my way with my signed copy that reads, "Hey Book
Barrett!"


That's pretty cool. I met Jonathan Harris at a con ages ago. He started to sign my photo and his pen was drying up. Then he exclaimed in perfect Dr. Smith voice "Oh, this damn pen!" So my signed picture is far from perfect as you can see all the marks he was making with the bad pen, but it definitely gives the autograph character and makes the memory of meeting him still stand out above so many others. Smile
 
Posts: 916 | Location: WESTWOOD NJ | Registered: May 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
NSU Elf
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This thread gives me some things to think about. That con by my house will be the first one I have ever gone to. Still not sure what autographs I am getting.
 
Posts: 647 | Location: Southern New Jersey | Registered: April 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of BGH
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To each his own. I collect nonsports, hockey, and some music. We do in person autographs for hockey. We do not pay the large sums I see offered at card shows. If former or current players will sign at a game or draft or some other event...terrific. If they do not, I don't feel like they owe me anything...though it might affect my collecting them. We also do some music autographs with the main goal on Christmas music items. I know...weird. Same thing here. Some people have been cagey as anything. Other artists do meet and greets at shows and sign or do photos with all comers. Usually doesn't take long and everyone seems hapoy. Fans get a moment, and the artists typically sell more stuff to people buying stuff to get signed. Then there are musicians who are stellar and actively engage fully with fans. You can not get better than those folks.

I do waffle a bit though. I have seen several people sign for reasonable money with the proceeds going to charity. I do respect that.

Pet Peeve: People who sign for money who sign what looks like a squiggle or a couple of loops. To me, that is pure gall. Also, people who sign but have obvious contempt for the very fans they are signing for. 'Nuff said.
 
Posts: 52 | Location: KY | Registered: May 30, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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